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#FutureOfWork

thinkin

Women @ Work – Is the great resignation set to continue?

The pandemic continues to take a heavy toll on women – burnout, for example, has reached alarmingly high levels. At the same time, many women have made career and life decisions driven by their experiences during the pandemic. For some, this has meant seeking new, more flexible working patterns; for others, it has meant leaving their employers or the workforce entirely.Is the great resignation set to continue?  What will it take for organisations to support and retain women in the new normal?  After a two-year setback for gender equality in the workplace, what actions should employers be taking? editor and invited experts Tessa MurrayEditor Dr Vinika Devasar RaoExecutive Director, INSEAD Emerging Markets Institute and Gender Initiative; Director, Hoffman Global Institute for Business & Society, Asia Emma CoddGlobal Inclusion Leader, Deloitte

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Redesigning Work: Is hybrid the answer? A ThinkIn with Lynda Gratton

This is a newsroom ThinkIn. In-person and digital-only tickets are available.Two years into the COVID19 pandemic and people in the UK are feeling things return to some semblance of normality – socialising is allowed, masks are not always required and the news isn’t always about COVID. But one change seems here to stay: hybrid working. And Lynda Gratton suggests, in her new book ‘Redesigning Work’ that this is the greatest global shift in the world of work for a century. But it’s not all plain sailing. Adapting global businesses and habits to this new structure of working requires a significant effort and a fundamental re-learning.Lynda has spent thirty years researching the technological, demographic, cultural and societal trends that are shaping work. Combining her knowledge and years of experience with all that the pandemic has taught us, she presents a four-step framework for redesigning work. Join this ThinkIn as we ask: how can we make remote working work.  editor and invited experts James HardingCo-Founder and Editor Lynda GrattonProfessor of Management Practice at London Business School and Author of ‘The 100 Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity’

thinkin

Systemic change in the workplace: Is the answer allyship?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn.Gender, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, class, mental health, geography are just some of the factors that give people more or fewer opportunities for success because of the barriers put up by society. What mechanisms truly work in getting people to notice, challenge and ultimately change their everyday behaviour, ingrained habits and well-worn relationships in the workplace? Do the people with the most power to make change identify with “allyship” as a concept? How can we tell active allyship apart from performative allyship, and how do we call it out when we do? Given there’s no such thing as the perfect ally, whose job is it to be an ally to the allies when they get it wrong? editor and invited experts Liz MoseleyEditor Dr David SmithAssociate Professor at Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School; Author, ‘Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace’ Jackie HenryManaging Partner, People and Purpose, Deloitte UK

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In conversation with Google’s Matt Brittin

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. As one of the superpowers of the internet, Google’s technology, tools and services  touch the daily lives of billions of people who go online every day. Google’s enormous presence and influence comes with great responsibility. Society expects higher standards from corporations and Governments are paying closer attention than ever to how big tech operates. Matt Brittin will be in conversation with James Harding, Tortoise editor and co-founder, about how Google approaches this responsibility, and the role digital technology, tools and skills can play in enabling a sustainable and inclusive recovery from Covid19 – from tackling climate change to supporting an evolving labour market. editor and invited experts James Harding Co-Founder and Editor Matt Brittin President of EMEA Business & Operations for Google

thinkin

What does it mean to work well?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. One in six people experience mental health problems in the workplace and it’s estimated that over 12% of sick days can be attributed to issues associated with poor mental health.  But what does it actually mean to look after your mental health? Are there ground rules or is it different for everyone? In the latest in a series of ThinkIns that aim to critically examine the public conversation about mental health and wellbeing, we ask where the responsibility lies for ensuring good mental health. Has progress been made to support those who struggle with their mental wellbeing? What should we be doing to create healthy habits in the workplace? editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Jen Fisher Chief Wellbeing Officer, Deloitte US Ricardo Araya Professor of Global Mental Health, and Director of the Centre for Global Mental Health, King’s College London Sapna Mahajan Director, Genomics in Society, Genome Canada

thinkin

Is hybrid working worse for women?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. By now, many of us have been involved with a hybrid working environment for a few months; indeed, it seems to be the new normal for many employers globally. And while it may have its perks, such as a reduced commute, are we ignoring the risk that more choice on where and when to work may increase inequality? Flexible working offers greater freedom to those with caring responsibilities or disabilities to work from home – but what can we do to avoid unintended consequences of this freedom? How do we ensure that this new way of working enables rather than hinders equality?   editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Emma Codd Global Inclusion Leader for Deloitte Lenita Freidenvall Senior Lecturer of Political Science at Stockholm University and Co-Director of the Women in Politics Research Network Rosie Campbell Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership, King’s College London

thinkin

Women @ Work – Is the great resignation set to continue?

The pandemic continues to take a heavy toll on women – burnout, for example, has reached alarmingly high levels. At the same time, many women have made career and life decisions driven by their experiences during the pandemic. For some, this has meant seeking new, more flexible working patterns; for others, it has meant leaving their employers or the workforce entirely.Is the great resignation set to continue?  What will it take for organisations to support and retain women in the new normal?  After a two-year setback for gender equality in the workplace, what actions should employers be taking? editor and invited experts Tessa MurrayEditor Dr Vinika Devasar RaoExecutive Director, INSEAD Emerging Markets Institute and Gender Initiative; Director, Hoffman Global Institute for Business & Society, Asia Emma CoddGlobal Inclusion Leader, Deloitte

thinkin

Redesigning Work: Is hybrid the answer? A ThinkIn with Lynda Gratton

This is a newsroom ThinkIn. In-person and digital-only tickets are available.Two years into the COVID19 pandemic and people in the UK are feeling things return to some semblance of normality – socialising is allowed, masks are not always required and the news isn’t always about COVID. But one change seems here to stay: hybrid working. And Lynda Gratton suggests, in her new book ‘Redesigning Work’ that this is the greatest global shift in the world of work for a century. But it’s not all plain sailing. Adapting global businesses and habits to this new structure of working requires a significant effort and a fundamental re-learning.Lynda has spent thirty years researching the technological, demographic, cultural and societal trends that are shaping work. Combining her knowledge and years of experience with all that the pandemic has taught us, she presents a four-step framework for redesigning work. Join this ThinkIn as we ask: how can we make remote working work.  editor and invited experts James HardingCo-Founder and Editor Lynda GrattonProfessor of Management Practice at London Business School and Author of ‘The 100 Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity’

thinkin

Systemic change in the workplace: Is the answer allyship?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn.Gender, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, class, mental health, geography are just some of the factors that give people more or fewer opportunities for success because of the barriers put up by society. What mechanisms truly work in getting people to notice, challenge and ultimately change their everyday behaviour, ingrained habits and well-worn relationships in the workplace? Do the people with the most power to make change identify with “allyship” as a concept? How can we tell active allyship apart from performative allyship, and how do we call it out when we do? Given there’s no such thing as the perfect ally, whose job is it to be an ally to the allies when they get it wrong? editor and invited experts Liz MoseleyEditor Dr David SmithAssociate Professor at Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School; Author, ‘Good Guys: How Men Can Be Better Allies for Women in the Workplace’ Jackie HenryManaging Partner, People and Purpose, Deloitte UK

thinkin

In conversation with Google’s Matt Brittin

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. As one of the superpowers of the internet, Google’s technology, tools and services  touch the daily lives of billions of people who go online every day. Google’s enormous presence and influence comes with great responsibility. Society expects higher standards from corporations and Governments are paying closer attention than ever to how big tech operates. Matt Brittin will be in conversation with James Harding, Tortoise editor and co-founder, about how Google approaches this responsibility, and the role digital technology, tools and skills can play in enabling a sustainable and inclusive recovery from Covid19 – from tackling climate change to supporting an evolving labour market. editor and invited experts James Harding Co-Founder and Editor Matt Brittin President of EMEA Business & Operations for Google

thinkin

What does it mean to work well?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. One in six people experience mental health problems in the workplace and it’s estimated that over 12% of sick days can be attributed to issues associated with poor mental health.  But what does it actually mean to look after your mental health? Are there ground rules or is it different for everyone? In the latest in a series of ThinkIns that aim to critically examine the public conversation about mental health and wellbeing, we ask where the responsibility lies for ensuring good mental health. Has progress been made to support those who struggle with their mental wellbeing? What should we be doing to create healthy habits in the workplace? editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Jen Fisher Chief Wellbeing Officer, Deloitte US Ricardo Araya Professor of Global Mental Health, and Director of the Centre for Global Mental Health, King’s College London Sapna Mahajan Director, Genomics in Society, Genome Canada

thinkin

Is hybrid working worse for women?

This is a digital-only ThinkIn. By now, many of us have been involved with a hybrid working environment for a few months; indeed, it seems to be the new normal for many employers globally. And while it may have its perks, such as a reduced commute, are we ignoring the risk that more choice on where and when to work may increase inequality? Flexible working offers greater freedom to those with caring responsibilities or disabilities to work from home – but what can we do to avoid unintended consequences of this freedom? How do we ensure that this new way of working enables rather than hinders equality?   editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Emma Codd Global Inclusion Leader for Deloitte Lenita Freidenvall Senior Lecturer of Political Science at Stockholm University and Co-Director of the Women in Politics Research Network Rosie Campbell Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership, King’s College London

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In conversation with Simon Sinek

This is a digital-only ThinkIn.Self-confessed ‘unshakeable optimist’ Simon Sinek has been described as a ‘visionary’. His book Start With Why, published in 2009, became a global sensation. Since then, he’s written several best-sellers including Leaders Eat Last and The Infinite Game. His first ThinkIn with Tortoise back in 2019 drew one of our biggest ever live audiences. We’re delighted to welcome him back, virtually this time, for an hour of his characteristic wit and wisdom reflecting on the power of optimism in tough times, the future of leadership and how the experiences of the past two years will impact working culture.Photograph Andrew Dolgin editor James HardingCo-founder and Editor

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The Tortoise Responsible Business Summit

Ken Murphy has had an extraordinary two years.  He became CEO of Tesco, the UK’s biggest supermarket chain, in October 2020. Since then he’s steered the business through unprecedented global challenges, from Covid to rising food prices, caused partly by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. “Really what Tesco exists for is, “how do you take something that maybe starts as a niche and make it available to the vast majority of the population, at an affordable price?” And that’s our mission.”Reuters Tesco shoppers are facing the biggest squeeze on household incomes since at least the 1950s, thanks to increasing labour, energy, and transportation costs.  And Ken Murphy says the company is “laser-focused on keeping the cost of the weekly shop in check”. “At Tesco we want you to spend less with us on everything, from your staples to everyday essentials… because right now every little helps.” Tesco ad But despite cost-cutting initiatives, including price matching against the budget supermarket Aldi, customers at Tesco are still seeing the cost of their shopping go up. “Grocery chains are battling for market share while many shoppers fight simply to get by, as the focus is increasingly on price.”ITV But… Ken Murphy doesn’t share the financial pain faced by some of his customers and staff. Over the past year, he’s earned 4.74 million pounds, which includes the highest annual bonus awarded by the supermarket since 2016. His total pay was 224 times the total pay and benefits of the average member of staff at Tesco, who has an annual income of £21,217.  That’s about £4,000 less than the minimum acceptable standard of living, according to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which is why some workers were willing to go on strike last year “Warehouse workers and drivers at Tesco are to hold a series of strikes over pay. The decision was made because workers were not offered a pay deal that keeps up to pace with inflation. More than one thousand Unite members based around the country will strike for 48 hours from 6am on December the 16th. Additional strikes will be held after Christmas. The industrial action could lead to shoppers in many parts of the country facing empty shelves in the run-up to Christmas.”Channels Television Tesco saw off that industrial action by making improved pay offers. And the company recently offered its staff advances, to help them avoid falling into debt.  The man who oversees how senior executives are paid at Tesco has defended how much the CEO earns. In a company report, he said that Ken Murphy’s take-home pay was fair, and he was satisfied that the bonus payouts were “appropriate”. And actually, Ken Murphy’s eye-watering payslip isn’t unusual amongst top executives at some of the UK’s biggest businesses. *** Tortoise’s Responsibility100 Index looked at the UK’s biggest listed companies. The ones in the FTSE 100 share index.  It found that, on average, CEOs of those companies were paid 30 per cent more this year compared to last year. The accountancy firm PWC thinks the salary increases were driven, in some sectors, by a post-Covid boom. In others it was down to performance targets being set lower in 2021 because of market uncertainty. And while the average CEO pay this year was 3.7 million pounds, fewer than half of FTSE 100 companies guarantee their employees the Living Wage. The disparity hasn’t gone unnoticed. Here’s Alistair Phillips-Davies, CEO of energy company SSE, being questioned by Cathy Newman on Channel 4 News: Cathy Newman: “Do you not feel at all embarrassed getting paid millions of pounds, when households up and down the country are struggling to feed themselves and heat their homes?” Alistair Phillips-Davies: “As I’ve said, as regards my pay, I don’t set my pay. It’s very transparent when I get paid. Unlike many people, is it transparent.”Channel 4 If the trends are to be believed, CEO pay checks will continue to rise. Being a CEO is not an easy job. These are, after all, some of Britain’s largest companies. But a business’ success is an accumulation of effort, shared by all of its employees. From the shop floor to the boardroom. If CEOs continue to be handsomely remunerated while employees struggle to make ends meet, there’ll be growing disenchantment in some workplaces. This episode was written by Maddy Diment and mixed by Hannah Varrall.

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Back to reality: how will going back to work work?

Ken Murphy has had an extraordinary two years.  He became CEO of Tesco, the UK’s biggest supermarket chain, in October 2020. Since then he’s steered the business through unprecedented global challenges, from Covid to rising food prices, caused partly by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. “Really what Tesco exists for is, “how do you take something that maybe starts as a niche and make it available to the vast majority of the population, at an affordable price?” And that’s our mission.”Reuters Tesco shoppers are facing the biggest squeeze on household incomes since at least the 1950s, thanks to increasing labour, energy, and transportation costs.  And Ken Murphy says the company is “laser-focused on keeping the cost of the weekly shop in check”. “At Tesco we want you to spend less with us on everything, from your staples to everyday essentials… because right now every little helps.” Tesco ad But despite cost-cutting initiatives, including price matching against the budget supermarket Aldi, customers at Tesco are still seeing the cost of their shopping go up. “Grocery chains are battling for market share while many shoppers fight simply to get by, as the focus is increasingly on price.”ITV But… Ken Murphy doesn’t share the financial pain faced by some of his customers and staff. Over the past year, he’s earned 4.74 million pounds, which includes the highest annual bonus awarded by the supermarket since 2016. His total pay was 224 times the total pay and benefits of the average member of staff at Tesco, who has an annual income of £21,217.  That’s about £4,000 less than the minimum acceptable standard of living, according to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which is why some workers were willing to go on strike last year “Warehouse workers and drivers at Tesco are to hold a series of strikes over pay. The decision was made because workers were not offered a pay deal that keeps up to pace with inflation. More than one thousand Unite members based around the country will strike for 48 hours from 6am on December the 16th. Additional strikes will be held after Christmas. The industrial action could lead to shoppers in many parts of the country facing empty shelves in the run-up to Christmas.”Channels Television Tesco saw off that industrial action by making improved pay offers. And the company recently offered its staff advances, to help them avoid falling into debt.  The man who oversees how senior executives are paid at Tesco has defended how much the CEO earns. In a company report, he said that Ken Murphy’s take-home pay was fair, and he was satisfied that the bonus payouts were “appropriate”. And actually, Ken Murphy’s eye-watering payslip isn’t unusual amongst top executives at some of the UK’s biggest businesses. *** Tortoise’s Responsibility100 Index looked at the UK’s biggest listed companies. The ones in the FTSE 100 share index.  It found that, on average, CEOs of those companies were paid 30 per cent more this year compared to last year. The accountancy firm PWC thinks the salary increases were driven, in some sectors, by a post-Covid boom. In others it was down to performance targets being set lower in 2021 because of market uncertainty. And while the average CEO pay this year was 3.7 million pounds, fewer than half of FTSE 100 companies guarantee their employees the Living Wage. The disparity hasn’t gone unnoticed. Here’s Alistair Phillips-Davies, CEO of energy company SSE, being questioned by Cathy Newman on Channel 4 News: Cathy Newman: “Do you not feel at all embarrassed getting paid millions of pounds, when households up and down the country are struggling to feed themselves and heat their homes?” Alistair Phillips-Davies: “As I’ve said, as regards my pay, I don’t set my pay. It’s very transparent when I get paid. Unlike many people, is it transparent.”Channel 4 If the trends are to be believed, CEO pay checks will continue to rise. Being a CEO is not an easy job. These are, after all, some of Britain’s largest companies. But a business’ success is an accumulation of effort, shared by all of its employees. From the shop floor to the boardroom. If CEOs continue to be handsomely remunerated while employees struggle to make ends meet, there’ll be growing disenchantment in some workplaces. This episode was written by Maddy Diment and mixed by Hannah Varrall.