Hello. It looks like youre using an ad blocker that may prevent our website from working properly. To receive the best Tortoise experience possible, please make sure any blockers are switched off and refresh the page.

If you have any questions or need help, let us know at memberhelp@tortoisemedia.com

#TrueNature

thinkin

In conversation with Richard Dawkins

Long stories short The UK’s National Grid trialled a new tool that pays homes to reduce electricity consumption.The French and German governments said a planned hydrogen pipeline from Barcelona to Marseilles will be extended to Germany.Bill Gates said there was “no chance” of keeping global heating below 1.5C. Whose moor? The granite, fog and wild ponies of Dartmoor offer a glimpse of a seemingly primaeval world in the heart of Britain. This weekend, it became the scene of an unusual protest that touched on money, power and how we tackle the climate crisis. On Saturday, thousands of people hiked over the moorland in protest at a court case that found there was no right to camp “wild” on Dartmoor without a landowner’s permission. The case was brought by Alexander Darwall, a hedge fund manager who owns a 4,000-acre Dartmoor estate. It was the last place in England or Wales where there was a right to camp wild. Darwall’s victory has already prompted a partial retreat, with landowners agreeing to allow wild camping in exchange for a payment from the Dartmoor National Park Authority. Campaigners say the agreement covers about four-fifths of the land where wild camping used to be permitted. So what? The case is a reminder of how concentrated land ownership is in Britain. According to the writer and campaigner Guy Shrubsole, 1 per cent of the population owns half the land in England. This matters because changing how we use the land is going to be critical to hitting net zero targets. Britain is more extensively farmed than either France or the US, and its woodland cover (at 13 per cent of our land area) is among the lowest in Europe. Changing land use requires the support of farmers and others who own and manage the land. To take one example: the largest store of carbon on UK land is peatland. Farmers and managers of grouse moors burn the grassland above peat to encourage the growth of tender new shoots that sheep and grouse like to feed on. But doing this releases carbon dioxide. In 2021 the government brought in new regulations to limit the burning of heather on peatland – but there’s been widespread burning since then. An investigation by Greenpeace Unearthed, published last year, found there had been 251 peatland burning incidents in the first season since the legislation was introduced. These included 51 burns on land protected by conservation designations, the investigation claimed. In evidence to Parliament, Shrubsole said that: 124 landowners own 60 per cent of England’s deep peat.Around 1,000 landowners own a third of England’s woods.95 per cent of the Yorkshire Dales is in private hands. Private ownership of land can be beneficial for the environment. The Danish billionaire Anders Povlsen has plans to restore native species in the Scottish highlands, where he owns thousands of acres. But as our Westminster Accounts investigation found, landowning MPs have led a campaign against rewilding. Anthony Mangnall, MP for Totnes, who was criticised for being slow to respond to the wild camping ruling, has received a donation of £5,000 from Darwall, the landowner who brought the case. (Mangnall said the donation has “not impacted my decisions or restricted me from saying anything”.) Relying on noblesse oblige may not get us to net zero. Restoring our connection to nature – through hiking and sleeping under the stars – is critical to understanding our roles as its guardians. Exploring alternative models of land ownership, such as community buyouts in Scotland that have put nature recovery at the heart of regenerating the countryside, offers a bulwark against the whims of a handful of private landowners. A message from Companies are investing more time producing climate risk disclosures based on the TCFD recommendations. However, these disclosures are not translating into actionable strategies to accelerate decarbonisation. The EY report analyses the reasons behind this by reviewing the disclosures made by 1,500 companies across 47 countries. This is sponsored by EY eco-nomics No debts, no nets Last year an environmental organisation lent Belize sufficient funds to buy back all of its foreign commercial debt, generating millions of dollars for marine conservation. The new loan has a low interest rate and a long repayment period, freeing the country to protect its marine territory including coral reefs rich in sea turtles. Ballooning debts and an interest in sustainable finance make such deals more likely in future. But a research note from analysts at Barclays, reported by Bloomberg, sounds a warning: such deals may look good but the funds allocated to environment projects are typically “a small fraction of the total deal size.” The risk is that deals like these generate more benefits for middlemen than they do for turtles. engagement and activism Explore no more Colombia has announced it will not approve any new oil and gas projects, in line with the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) finding that any exploration is incompatible with achieving net zero by 2050. The country ranks 34th in the world in terms of oil reserves and generated $1.3 billion in royalties from oil and gas in 2021. Columbia’s new leftist president, Gustavo Petro, campaigned on a promise of a “green, not a black” future for the nation, but has battled a fractured legislature and his own finance minister’s contradictory statements that the country is open to new projects. As for the rest of the world, very few have signed up to an end date for exploration: the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance launched in Glasgow has faltered after founding member Costa Rica backed away from its leadership role. In the UK, opposition leader Keir Starmer said that investment in new oil and gas would be banned under a Labour government. policy Wham CBAM The EU’s proposed carbon border tax is already beginning to reshape global markets. Thailand’s largest food processing company, CP Foods, has said it will eliminate coal power from its operations, citing the incoming European tariffs on carbon-intensive goods as a key reason. It had previously spent over $10 million a year on coal purchases. The company also says it wants to help 6,500 small and medium size businesses in its supply chain to shrink their emissions. Europe’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is the first time a carbon price has applied to imports. The US, conversely, has not sought to price carbon but instead is using tax credits to subsidise green industries. Both policies are game changing. nature Cooking up a case A small indigenous community in British Columbia is using evidence gathered from ancient trees and the journals of British explorer Captain Cook to make a historic land rights claim. Representatives of the Nuchatlaht First Nation say they are the rightful stewards of 200 square kilometres in the northern part of Nootka Island, which is currently owned by the Crown. To win, they have to prove they continuously and exclusively occupied the land in 1846. They are using evidence of “culturally modified trees” – red cedars that show marks where they were harvested for bark by indigenous people – to bolster their claim. Also presented to the court were the writings of James Cook who said of the Nuchatlaht that they had “high notions of everything the country produced being their exclusive property”. If they win, as expected, the community says it will enhance and protect nature in the area. Thanks for reading. Jeevan Vasagar@jeevanvasagar Additional reporting by Barney Macintyre. If you want to get in touch, drop us a line at sensemaker@tortoisemedia.com. Sponsored by With thanks to our coalition members: a network of organisations similarly committed to achieving Net Zero Visit the homepage to find out more about the coalition and join us. Slow newscast Egypt’s bad cop The story of one man, fighting to his last breath, to reveal the darkness that lies behind this year’s UN Climate Change Conference.

thinkin

Who can save England’s rivers?

Long stories short The UK’s National Grid trialled a new tool that pays homes to reduce electricity consumption.The French and German governments said a planned hydrogen pipeline from Barcelona to Marseilles will be extended to Germany.Bill Gates said there was “no chance” of keeping global heating below 1.5C. Whose moor? The granite, fog and wild ponies of Dartmoor offer a glimpse of a seemingly primaeval world in the heart of Britain. This weekend, it became the scene of an unusual protest that touched on money, power and how we tackle the climate crisis. On Saturday, thousands of people hiked over the moorland in protest at a court case that found there was no right to camp “wild” on Dartmoor without a landowner’s permission. The case was brought by Alexander Darwall, a hedge fund manager who owns a 4,000-acre Dartmoor estate. It was the last place in England or Wales where there was a right to camp wild. Darwall’s victory has already prompted a partial retreat, with landowners agreeing to allow wild camping in exchange for a payment from the Dartmoor National Park Authority. Campaigners say the agreement covers about four-fifths of the land where wild camping used to be permitted. So what? The case is a reminder of how concentrated land ownership is in Britain. According to the writer and campaigner Guy Shrubsole, 1 per cent of the population owns half the land in England. This matters because changing how we use the land is going to be critical to hitting net zero targets. Britain is more extensively farmed than either France or the US, and its woodland cover (at 13 per cent of our land area) is among the lowest in Europe. Changing land use requires the support of farmers and others who own and manage the land. To take one example: the largest store of carbon on UK land is peatland. Farmers and managers of grouse moors burn the grassland above peat to encourage the growth of tender new shoots that sheep and grouse like to feed on. But doing this releases carbon dioxide. In 2021 the government brought in new regulations to limit the burning of heather on peatland – but there’s been widespread burning since then. An investigation by Greenpeace Unearthed, published last year, found there had been 251 peatland burning incidents in the first season since the legislation was introduced. These included 51 burns on land protected by conservation designations, the investigation claimed. In evidence to Parliament, Shrubsole said that: 124 landowners own 60 per cent of England’s deep peat.Around 1,000 landowners own a third of England’s woods.95 per cent of the Yorkshire Dales is in private hands. Private ownership of land can be beneficial for the environment. The Danish billionaire Anders Povlsen has plans to restore native species in the Scottish highlands, where he owns thousands of acres. But as our Westminster Accounts investigation found, landowning MPs have led a campaign against rewilding. Anthony Mangnall, MP for Totnes, who was criticised for being slow to respond to the wild camping ruling, has received a donation of £5,000 from Darwall, the landowner who brought the case. (Mangnall said the donation has “not impacted my decisions or restricted me from saying anything”.) Relying on noblesse oblige may not get us to net zero. Restoring our connection to nature – through hiking and sleeping under the stars – is critical to understanding our roles as its guardians. Exploring alternative models of land ownership, such as community buyouts in Scotland that have put nature recovery at the heart of regenerating the countryside, offers a bulwark against the whims of a handful of private landowners. A message from Companies are investing more time producing climate risk disclosures based on the TCFD recommendations. However, these disclosures are not translating into actionable strategies to accelerate decarbonisation. The EY report analyses the reasons behind this by reviewing the disclosures made by 1,500 companies across 47 countries. This is sponsored by EY eco-nomics No debts, no nets Last year an environmental organisation lent Belize sufficient funds to buy back all of its foreign commercial debt, generating millions of dollars for marine conservation. The new loan has a low interest rate and a long repayment period, freeing the country to protect its marine territory including coral reefs rich in sea turtles. Ballooning debts and an interest in sustainable finance make such deals more likely in future. But a research note from analysts at Barclays, reported by Bloomberg, sounds a warning: such deals may look good but the funds allocated to environment projects are typically “a small fraction of the total deal size.” The risk is that deals like these generate more benefits for middlemen than they do for turtles. engagement and activism Explore no more Colombia has announced it will not approve any new oil and gas projects, in line with the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) finding that any exploration is incompatible with achieving net zero by 2050. The country ranks 34th in the world in terms of oil reserves and generated $1.3 billion in royalties from oil and gas in 2021. Columbia’s new leftist president, Gustavo Petro, campaigned on a promise of a “green, not a black” future for the nation, but has battled a fractured legislature and his own finance minister’s contradictory statements that the country is open to new projects. As for the rest of the world, very few have signed up to an end date for exploration: the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance launched in Glasgow has faltered after founding member Costa Rica backed away from its leadership role. In the UK, opposition leader Keir Starmer said that investment in new oil and gas would be banned under a Labour government. policy Wham CBAM The EU’s proposed carbon border tax is already beginning to reshape global markets. Thailand’s largest food processing company, CP Foods, has said it will eliminate coal power from its operations, citing the incoming European tariffs on carbon-intensive goods as a key reason. It had previously spent over $10 million a year on coal purchases. The company also says it wants to help 6,500 small and medium size businesses in its supply chain to shrink their emissions. Europe’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is the first time a carbon price has applied to imports. The US, conversely, has not sought to price carbon but instead is using tax credits to subsidise green industries. Both policies are game changing. nature Cooking up a case A small indigenous community in British Columbia is using evidence gathered from ancient trees and the journals of British explorer Captain Cook to make a historic land rights claim. Representatives of the Nuchatlaht First Nation say they are the rightful stewards of 200 square kilometres in the northern part of Nootka Island, which is currently owned by the Crown. To win, they have to prove they continuously and exclusively occupied the land in 1846. They are using evidence of “culturally modified trees” – red cedars that show marks where they were harvested for bark by indigenous people – to bolster their claim. Also presented to the court were the writings of James Cook who said of the Nuchatlaht that they had “high notions of everything the country produced being their exclusive property”. If they win, as expected, the community says it will enhance and protect nature in the area. Thanks for reading. Jeevan Vasagar@jeevanvasagar Additional reporting by Barney Macintyre. If you want to get in touch, drop us a line at sensemaker@tortoisemedia.com. Sponsored by With thanks to our coalition members: a network of organisations similarly committed to achieving Net Zero Visit the homepage to find out more about the coalition and join us. Slow newscast Egypt’s bad cop The story of one man, fighting to his last breath, to reveal the darkness that lies behind this year’s UN Climate Change Conference.

thinkin

A ThinkIn with Andrew Cotter, Olive and Mabel

Long stories short The UK’s National Grid trialled a new tool that pays homes to reduce electricity consumption.The French and German governments said a planned hydrogen pipeline from Barcelona to Marseilles will be extended to Germany.Bill Gates said there was “no chance” of keeping global heating below 1.5C. Whose moor? The granite, fog and wild ponies of Dartmoor offer a glimpse of a seemingly primaeval world in the heart of Britain. This weekend, it became the scene of an unusual protest that touched on money, power and how we tackle the climate crisis. On Saturday, thousands of people hiked over the moorland in protest at a court case that found there was no right to camp “wild” on Dartmoor without a landowner’s permission. The case was brought by Alexander Darwall, a hedge fund manager who owns a 4,000-acre Dartmoor estate. It was the last place in England or Wales where there was a right to camp wild. Darwall’s victory has already prompted a partial retreat, with landowners agreeing to allow wild camping in exchange for a payment from the Dartmoor National Park Authority. Campaigners say the agreement covers about four-fifths of the land where wild camping used to be permitted. So what? The case is a reminder of how concentrated land ownership is in Britain. According to the writer and campaigner Guy Shrubsole, 1 per cent of the population owns half the land in England. This matters because changing how we use the land is going to be critical to hitting net zero targets. Britain is more extensively farmed than either France or the US, and its woodland cover (at 13 per cent of our land area) is among the lowest in Europe. Changing land use requires the support of farmers and others who own and manage the land. To take one example: the largest store of carbon on UK land is peatland. Farmers and managers of grouse moors burn the grassland above peat to encourage the growth of tender new shoots that sheep and grouse like to feed on. But doing this releases carbon dioxide. In 2021 the government brought in new regulations to limit the burning of heather on peatland – but there’s been widespread burning since then. An investigation by Greenpeace Unearthed, published last year, found there had been 251 peatland burning incidents in the first season since the legislation was introduced. These included 51 burns on land protected by conservation designations, the investigation claimed. In evidence to Parliament, Shrubsole said that: 124 landowners own 60 per cent of England’s deep peat.Around 1,000 landowners own a third of England’s woods.95 per cent of the Yorkshire Dales is in private hands. Private ownership of land can be beneficial for the environment. The Danish billionaire Anders Povlsen has plans to restore native species in the Scottish highlands, where he owns thousands of acres. But as our Westminster Accounts investigation found, landowning MPs have led a campaign against rewilding. Anthony Mangnall, MP for Totnes, who was criticised for being slow to respond to the wild camping ruling, has received a donation of £5,000 from Darwall, the landowner who brought the case. (Mangnall said the donation has “not impacted my decisions or restricted me from saying anything”.) Relying on noblesse oblige may not get us to net zero. Restoring our connection to nature – through hiking and sleeping under the stars – is critical to understanding our roles as its guardians. Exploring alternative models of land ownership, such as community buyouts in Scotland that have put nature recovery at the heart of regenerating the countryside, offers a bulwark against the whims of a handful of private landowners. A message from Companies are investing more time producing climate risk disclosures based on the TCFD recommendations. However, these disclosures are not translating into actionable strategies to accelerate decarbonisation. The EY report analyses the reasons behind this by reviewing the disclosures made by 1,500 companies across 47 countries. This is sponsored by EY eco-nomics No debts, no nets Last year an environmental organisation lent Belize sufficient funds to buy back all of its foreign commercial debt, generating millions of dollars for marine conservation. The new loan has a low interest rate and a long repayment period, freeing the country to protect its marine territory including coral reefs rich in sea turtles. Ballooning debts and an interest in sustainable finance make such deals more likely in future. But a research note from analysts at Barclays, reported by Bloomberg, sounds a warning: such deals may look good but the funds allocated to environment projects are typically “a small fraction of the total deal size.” The risk is that deals like these generate more benefits for middlemen than they do for turtles. engagement and activism Explore no more Colombia has announced it will not approve any new oil and gas projects, in line with the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) finding that any exploration is incompatible with achieving net zero by 2050. The country ranks 34th in the world in terms of oil reserves and generated $1.3 billion in royalties from oil and gas in 2021. Columbia’s new leftist president, Gustavo Petro, campaigned on a promise of a “green, not a black” future for the nation, but has battled a fractured legislature and his own finance minister’s contradictory statements that the country is open to new projects. As for the rest of the world, very few have signed up to an end date for exploration: the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance launched in Glasgow has faltered after founding member Costa Rica backed away from its leadership role. In the UK, opposition leader Keir Starmer said that investment in new oil and gas would be banned under a Labour government. policy Wham CBAM The EU’s proposed carbon border tax is already beginning to reshape global markets. Thailand’s largest food processing company, CP Foods, has said it will eliminate coal power from its operations, citing the incoming European tariffs on carbon-intensive goods as a key reason. It had previously spent over $10 million a year on coal purchases. The company also says it wants to help 6,500 small and medium size businesses in its supply chain to shrink their emissions. Europe’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is the first time a carbon price has applied to imports. The US, conversely, has not sought to price carbon but instead is using tax credits to subsidise green industries. Both policies are game changing. nature Cooking up a case A small indigenous community in British Columbia is using evidence gathered from ancient trees and the journals of British explorer Captain Cook to make a historic land rights claim. Representatives of the Nuchatlaht First Nation say they are the rightful stewards of 200 square kilometres in the northern part of Nootka Island, which is currently owned by the Crown. To win, they have to prove they continuously and exclusively occupied the land in 1846. They are using evidence of “culturally modified trees” – red cedars that show marks where they were harvested for bark by indigenous people – to bolster their claim. Also presented to the court were the writings of James Cook who said of the Nuchatlaht that they had “high notions of everything the country produced being their exclusive property”. If they win, as expected, the community says it will enhance and protect nature in the area. Thanks for reading. Jeevan Vasagar@jeevanvasagar Additional reporting by Barney Macintyre. If you want to get in touch, drop us a line at sensemaker@tortoisemedia.com. Sponsored by With thanks to our coalition members: a network of organisations similarly committed to achieving Net Zero Visit the homepage to find out more about the coalition and join us. Slow newscast Egypt’s bad cop The story of one man, fighting to his last breath, to reveal the darkness that lies behind this year’s UN Climate Change Conference.

thinkin

Biodiversity rules: what more should all of us be doing to protect nature?

Long stories short The UK’s National Grid trialled a new tool that pays homes to reduce electricity consumption.The French and German governments said a planned hydrogen pipeline from Barcelona to Marseilles will be extended to Germany.Bill Gates said there was “no chance” of keeping global heating below 1.5C. Whose moor? The granite, fog and wild ponies of Dartmoor offer a glimpse of a seemingly primaeval world in the heart of Britain. This weekend, it became the scene of an unusual protest that touched on money, power and how we tackle the climate crisis. On Saturday, thousands of people hiked over the moorland in protest at a court case that found there was no right to camp “wild” on Dartmoor without a landowner’s permission. The case was brought by Alexander Darwall, a hedge fund manager who owns a 4,000-acre Dartmoor estate. It was the last place in England or Wales where there was a right to camp wild. Darwall’s victory has already prompted a partial retreat, with landowners agreeing to allow wild camping in exchange for a payment from the Dartmoor National Park Authority. Campaigners say the agreement covers about four-fifths of the land where wild camping used to be permitted. So what? The case is a reminder of how concentrated land ownership is in Britain. According to the writer and campaigner Guy Shrubsole, 1 per cent of the population owns half the land in England. This matters because changing how we use the land is going to be critical to hitting net zero targets. Britain is more extensively farmed than either France or the US, and its woodland cover (at 13 per cent of our land area) is among the lowest in Europe. Changing land use requires the support of farmers and others who own and manage the land. To take one example: the largest store of carbon on UK land is peatland. Farmers and managers of grouse moors burn the grassland above peat to encourage the growth of tender new shoots that sheep and grouse like to feed on. But doing this releases carbon dioxide. In 2021 the government brought in new regulations to limit the burning of heather on peatland – but there’s been widespread burning since then. An investigation by Greenpeace Unearthed, published last year, found there had been 251 peatland burning incidents in the first season since the legislation was introduced. These included 51 burns on land protected by conservation designations, the investigation claimed. In evidence to Parliament, Shrubsole said that: 124 landowners own 60 per cent of England’s deep peat.Around 1,000 landowners own a third of England’s woods.95 per cent of the Yorkshire Dales is in private hands. Private ownership of land can be beneficial for the environment. The Danish billionaire Anders Povlsen has plans to restore native species in the Scottish highlands, where he owns thousands of acres. But as our Westminster Accounts investigation found, landowning MPs have led a campaign against rewilding. Anthony Mangnall, MP for Totnes, who was criticised for being slow to respond to the wild camping ruling, has received a donation of £5,000 from Darwall, the landowner who brought the case. (Mangnall said the donation has “not impacted my decisions or restricted me from saying anything”.) Relying on noblesse oblige may not get us to net zero. Restoring our connection to nature – through hiking and sleeping under the stars – is critical to understanding our roles as its guardians. Exploring alternative models of land ownership, such as community buyouts in Scotland that have put nature recovery at the heart of regenerating the countryside, offers a bulwark against the whims of a handful of private landowners. A message from Companies are investing more time producing climate risk disclosures based on the TCFD recommendations. However, these disclosures are not translating into actionable strategies to accelerate decarbonisation. The EY report analyses the reasons behind this by reviewing the disclosures made by 1,500 companies across 47 countries. This is sponsored by EY eco-nomics No debts, no nets Last year an environmental organisation lent Belize sufficient funds to buy back all of its foreign commercial debt, generating millions of dollars for marine conservation. The new loan has a low interest rate and a long repayment period, freeing the country to protect its marine territory including coral reefs rich in sea turtles. Ballooning debts and an interest in sustainable finance make such deals more likely in future. But a research note from analysts at Barclays, reported by Bloomberg, sounds a warning: such deals may look good but the funds allocated to environment projects are typically “a small fraction of the total deal size.” The risk is that deals like these generate more benefits for middlemen than they do for turtles. engagement and activism Explore no more Colombia has announced it will not approve any new oil and gas projects, in line with the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) finding that any exploration is incompatible with achieving net zero by 2050. The country ranks 34th in the world in terms of oil reserves and generated $1.3 billion in royalties from oil and gas in 2021. Columbia’s new leftist president, Gustavo Petro, campaigned on a promise of a “green, not a black” future for the nation, but has battled a fractured legislature and his own finance minister’s contradictory statements that the country is open to new projects. As for the rest of the world, very few have signed up to an end date for exploration: the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance launched in Glasgow has faltered after founding member Costa Rica backed away from its leadership role. In the UK, opposition leader Keir Starmer said that investment in new oil and gas would be banned under a Labour government. policy Wham CBAM The EU’s proposed carbon border tax is already beginning to reshape global markets. Thailand’s largest food processing company, CP Foods, has said it will eliminate coal power from its operations, citing the incoming European tariffs on carbon-intensive goods as a key reason. It had previously spent over $10 million a year on coal purchases. The company also says it wants to help 6,500 small and medium size businesses in its supply chain to shrink their emissions. Europe’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is the first time a carbon price has applied to imports. The US, conversely, has not sought to price carbon but instead is using tax credits to subsidise green industries. Both policies are game changing. nature Cooking up a case A small indigenous community in British Columbia is using evidence gathered from ancient trees and the journals of British explorer Captain Cook to make a historic land rights claim. Representatives of the Nuchatlaht First Nation say they are the rightful stewards of 200 square kilometres in the northern part of Nootka Island, which is currently owned by the Crown. To win, they have to prove they continuously and exclusively occupied the land in 1846. They are using evidence of “culturally modified trees” – red cedars that show marks where they were harvested for bark by indigenous people – to bolster their claim. Also presented to the court were the writings of James Cook who said of the Nuchatlaht that they had “high notions of everything the country produced being their exclusive property”. If they win, as expected, the community says it will enhance and protect nature in the area. Thanks for reading. Jeevan Vasagar@jeevanvasagar Additional reporting by Barney Macintyre. If you want to get in touch, drop us a line at sensemaker@tortoisemedia.com. Sponsored by With thanks to our coalition members: a network of organisations similarly committed to achieving Net Zero Visit the homepage to find out more about the coalition and join us. Slow newscast Egypt’s bad cop The story of one man, fighting to his last breath, to reveal the darkness that lies behind this year’s UN Climate Change Conference.