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#RethinkingEducation

thinkin

Do faith schools have a place in modern education?

About a third of all state-funded schools in England and Wales are schools with “a religious character”, otherwise known as “faith schools” — around 37% of primary schools and 19% of secondary schools are faith-based. The Government’s flagship free schools policy has been very popular with organised religious groups, but they are a mixed bag when it comes to performance. Some faith school do out-perform non-faith schools yet Ofsted’s latest statistics show that 25% of non-association independent faith schools have not met required school standards. So, can it be argued that they offer a better quality education, or is it just a way to try and boost congregations? Why are faith schools so popular — what do they offer that non-faith school don’t? Should we be actively segregating our children by religion? And is it appropriate that they receive public funds? editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Alastair Lichten Head of Education and Schools, The National Secular Society Imam Mansoor Clarke Baitul Futuh Mosque Joshua Rowe Chair of Governors, The King David Highschool Sarah Hill Governor of a Church of England school and Teacher

thinkin

Do faith schools have a place in modern education?

About a third of all state-funded schools in England and Wales are schools with “a religious character”, otherwise known as “faith schools” — around 37% of primary schools and 19% of secondary schools are faith-based. The Government’s flagship free schools policy has been very popular with organised religious groups, but they are a mixed bag when it comes to performance. Some faith school do out-perform non-faith schools yet Ofsted’s latest statistics show that 25% of non-association independent faith schools have not met required school standards. So, can it be argued that they offer a better quality education, or is it just a way to try and boost congregations? Why are faith schools so popular — what do they offer that non-faith school don’t? Should we be actively segregating our children by religion? And is it appropriate that they receive public funds? editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Alastair Lichten Head of Education and Schools, The National Secular Society Imam Mansoor Clarke Baitul Futuh Mosque Joshua Rowe Chair of Governors, The King David Highschool Sarah Hill Governor of a Church of England school and Teacher

thinkin

Do faith schools have a place in modern education?

About a third of all state-funded schools in England and Wales are schools with “a religious character”, otherwise known as “faith schools” — around 37% of primary schools and 19% of secondary schools are faith-based. The Government’s flagship free schools policy has been very popular with organised religious groups, but they are a mixed bag when it comes to performance. Some faith school do out-perform non-faith schools yet Ofsted’s latest statistics show that 25% of non-association independent faith schools have not met required school standards. So, can it be argued that they offer a better quality education, or is it just a way to try and boost congregations? Why are faith schools so popular — what do they offer that non-faith school don’t? Should we be actively segregating our children by religion? And is it appropriate that they receive public funds? editor and invited experts Liz Moseley Editor Alastair Lichten Head of Education and Schools, The National Secular Society Imam Mansoor Clarke Baitul Futuh Mosque Joshua Rowe Chair of Governors, The King David Highschool Sarah Hill Governor of a Church of England school and Teacher