Is healthtech innovation having unintended consequences for patients?

About this ThinkIn

This ThinkIn is in partnership with TTP

The pandemic has accelerated the use of digital technology in healthcare. From implantable technology to online appointments and personalised apps that predict you’re unwell before you have symptoms, the line between high-tech consumer goods and medical devices is becoming increasingly blurred. As we grapple with a range of urgent global health challenges, how much can we expect tech innovation to provide scalable solutions that are affordable and accessible to everybody? Can invention keep pace with demand? How do we distinguish between high-tech consumer goods and genuine medical devices? And how should we balance value, efficacy and, of course, safety in bringing new technologies to market?

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Editor and invited experts

Liz Moseley
Members’ Editor

Lord James O’Shaughnessy
Member of the House of Lords since 2015. James has served as Parliamentary Under Secretary for Health between 2016 and 2018. As Minister, James led efforts to improve innovation within the NHS and to grow the UK’s life science & healthtech industries.

Dr Sam Roberts
Managing Director of Health and Care at Legal and General, focusing on our investment strategy across the health and care sector within L&G’s Capital and Retail Retirement businesses. Prior to this Sam was Chief Executive of the Accelerated Access Collaborative, the national umbrella organisation for health innovation, hosted in NHS England and NHS Improvement.

Dr Dan Strange
Medical Devices Consultant, TTP. He is passionate about developing world-class technologies and therapies that provide meaningful improvements to people’s lives. In March 2020 Dan had a leading role in TTP’s effort to rapidly develop the CoVent ventilator in response to the Ventilator Challenge organised by the UK Government.