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How do we get 2m under 25s into work?


About this ThinkIn

We know that youth unemployment will rocket as a result of the pandemic, but what should the government do about it?

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Under-25s were two and half times more likely than others to have been working in the parts of the economy that shut-down in March. The Resolution Foundation estimated that the virus could leave at least 600,000 more young people without work, and even before the pandemic 800,000 people aged 16-24 were not in education, employment or training (NEET).

On July 8, Rishi Sunak announced support for young workers worth over £2bn in his summer statement. The money will fund work placements for young people claiming universal credit, coaching, apprenticeships and internships, job seeking advice and training. It sounds great. But is it enough? How will it work in practice? Will the effects last? And will all young people benefit – or will some get left behind?

Chair: James Harding, Editor and Co-founder, Tortoise

Our special guests include:

Anneliese Dodds, the British Labour and Co-operative politician serving as Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer since 2020. She is the first woman to be appointed this position. She has been Member of Parliament (MP) for Oxford East since 2017 and was a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for South East England from 2014 to 2017. She served in the Shadow Treasury Team of Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell as Shadow Financial Secretary to the Treasury from 2017 to 2020.

Kathleen Henehan, Research and Policy Analyst at the Resolution Foundation. She specialises in post-16 skills and education, including apprenticeships, technical and higher education, and adult skills development. Prior to joining Resolution Foundation, Kathleen worked at Universities UK, where she focused on graduate employment outcomes and learning and teaching policy. She has a PhD in Political Science from the London School of Economics.

Euan Blair, Co-Founder & CEO of White Hat, a tech startup democratising access to the best careers. It provides courses and a learning platform for apprentices to complete their professional certifications, coaching support and social events so they don’t miss out on the university experience.

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Under-25s were two and half times more likely than others to have been working in the parts of the economy that shut-down in March. The Resolution Foundation estimated that the virus could leave at least 600,000 more young people without work, and even before the pandemic 800,000 people aged 16-24 were not in education, employment or training (NEET).

On July 8, Rishi Sunak announced support for young workers worth over £2bn in his summer statement. The money will fund work placements for young people claiming universal credit, coaching, apprenticeships and internships, job seeking advice and training. It sounds great. But is it enough? How will it work in practice? Will the effects last? And will all young people benefit – or will some get left behind?


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Editor and invited experts

James Harding
Co-founder and Editor

Anneliese Dodds is the British Labour and Co-operative politician serving as Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer since 2020. She has been Member of Parliament (MP) for Oxford East since 2017 and was a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for South East England from 2014 to 2017.

Kathleen Henehan, Research and Policy Analyst at the Resolution Foundation. She specialises in post-16 skills and education, including apprenticeships, technical and higher education, and adult skills development. Prior to joining Resolution Foundation, Kathleen worked at Universities UK, where she focused on graduate employment outcomes and learning and teaching policy. She has a PhD in Political Science from the London School of Economics.

Euan Blair, Co-Founder & CEO of White Hat, a tech startup democratising access to the best careers. It provides courses and a learning platform for apprentices to complete their professional certifications, coaching support and social events so they don’t miss out on the university experience.