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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM – JUNE 06: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 24 HOURS AFTER CREATE DATE AND TIME) (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white) Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex departs the Rolls Building of the High Court after giving evidence during the Mirror Group phone hacking trial on June 6, 2023 in London, England. Prince Harry is one of several claimants in a lawsuit against Mirror Group Newspapers related to allegations of unlawful information gathering in previous decades. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
Ducks not in a row

Ducks not in a row

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM – JUNE 06: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 24 HOURS AFTER CREATE DATE AND TIME) (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white) Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex departs the Rolls Building of the High Court after giving evidence during the Mirror Group phone hacking trial on June 6, 2023 in London, England. Prince Harry is one of several claimants in a lawsuit against Mirror Group Newspapers related to allegations of unlawful information gathering in previous decades. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)

Harry squirms under cross-examination

There are 33 Daily Mirror articles at the heart of Prince Harry’s claim that the paper hacked his phone to write them. He’d had years to prepare his case and he had five hours yesterday to show under cross-examination that it was solid. Without wishing to prejudge the majesty of the law, the Telegraph’s Victoria Ward suggests the prince was in over his head. He offered no firm evidence that specific lines were obtained by hacking and when asked where the reporters had found their material he told the paper’s barrister he’d have to ask them. Bringing Britain’s press to heel is now his life’s work, Harry says. To do that he will need to prove hacking instead of merely allege it. His assertion that there was no other way of getting the information used in the articles may turn out to be true, but hunch tends not to win in court. The case continues.

Photograph Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images